Peter Brooks

Peter Brooks

Education

  • University of Natal, Pietermaritzburg, BSc. 1979
  • Major Subjects; Maths & Physics

Industry Qualifications

  • ITIL V2 Manager’s Certificate in IT Service Management
  • ITIL V3 ITIL Expert Certification
  • ISO20000 Consultant’s Certificate Management
  • Fellow in Service Management (FSM)® (prISM)

 

  • Certified ISEB instructor for ITIL Foundations + Service Manager courses
  • FISM - Fellow of the Institute of IT Service Management
  • Marketing and Business Development Director itSMF International
  • Marketing Director itSMF South Africa
  • Member of itSMF South Africa Western Cape

Consulting Delivery

  • Governance
  • Policy Consulting - start up organisation
  • Service Governance
  • Business Analysis
  • OpenView Network and System Management; design and implementation.
  • Secure web implementation.
  • HP Service Desk implementation.
  • Application, System, and Network Consolidation.
  • Business Disaster Recovery process consulting, implementation and testing.
  • ITIL process management (practical consulting delivery):
Service Portfolio    Service Strategy    Service Desk
Incident Problem Configuration
Change Release Capacity
Financial Availability Service level

Specialties and interests

Specialties
ASM Adaptive Service Model
Service Governance Business Analysis
CSF Capacity
Consulting Demand
FISM ITSM
Governance HP OpenView
ISO20000 ITIL
KPI Metric Design and Implementation
Metrics Open Source
Policy Requirements
SANS15000 Security
Service Desk Teaching
Training Service Management
Interests
Dialetheism :Service governance
Physics :Philosophy
Psychiatry :Maths
Ontology

Travel

I have never been further
As08-16-2593.jpg north Helsinki Helsinki 60°10′15″N 024°56′15″E
south Dunedin Dunedin 45°52′S 170°30′E
west Sausalito Sausalito Coordinates: 37°51′33″N 122°29′07″W ]
east Rotorua Rotorua 38°08′16″S 176°15′05″E
... and higher than Title=3.050 m3.050 m
... and Title=faster than 320 kphfaster than 320 kph (on the ground)

 

 

Publications 

 

 

Adopting Service Governance

Collaborative Consulting
ISBN: 978-0113314652 ISBN: 978-0113313914
Webinar: Adopting Service Governance: Governing portfolio value for sound corporate citizenship Review in International Best Practice
Issues in corporate governance and service governance as a solution  
AXELOS interview with Peter Brooks  
Service Governance in the Cloud  

 

Publications

 

Adopting Service Governance.png
Adopting Service Governance - Governing portfolio value for sound corporate citizenship - AXELOS 2015 ISBN: 978-0113314652
Collaborative Consulting.jpg
Collaborative Consulting – TSO 2013 ISBN: 978-0113313914
  Review - Ivor Macfarlane
Integrated Requirements.jpg
An Integrated Requirements Process - Governing Cost & Risk in Business Analysis - itSMFsa 2013 ISBN: 978-1490489162
  Review - David Lowe
  Review - Karen Ferris
Metrics for Service Management.jpg
Metrics for Service Management: Designing for ITIL – VHP 2012 ISBN-13: 978-9087536480
Metrics for IT Service Management.jpg

Metrics for IT Service Management – VHP 2006 ISBN-13: 978-9077212691

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Definition of Service Governance


Service Governance describes the means of achieving effective corporate and portfolio governance, within the ‘comply or explain’ framework, by designing the service portfolio as the overarching management system that monitors & controls corporate financial performance & value delivery.

From '''Adopting Service Governance''' http://service-governance.org/index.php?title=Category:Best_Practice Service Governance - Best Practice

Website URL: http://za.linkedin.com/in/peterhmbrooks/

SMEXA'16 -- presentations and records

Call for authors - itSMF International magazine

Have you got something interesting to say about Service Management or Service Governance? Have you got an interesting case study?

 

If so, the itSMF International are looking for authors. The previous edition of the e-zine is here:

 

itSMF International E-Zine September 2016

 

If you would like to contribute, please contact: Bruce Harvey at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 

SMEXA'16 - Day 2 - Kepner-Tregoe - Organisational Change management

SMEXA'16 - Day 2

 

Cost:                   No charge

 

Day 2 9th November 2016
15H00 – 16H00 Integrating Kepner-Tregoe with Incident, Problem and Change Management
Presenter 1   Stefan Brahmer 
16H00 to 17H00  Organisational Change management – how to get it right!
Presenter 2     Johann Botha – getITright (Sponsor)

 

 

Join us here:


Online Meeting
https://join.freeconferencecall.com/admin9594

Audio
Dial-In Number (South Africa): 087 825 0143, Access Code: 485646

International Dial-In Numbers
https://www.freeconferencecall.com/wall/admin9594/#international

Why even the 'right thing to do', with many benefits and advantages is rejected.

It is easy to see what's wrong, with many things. Particularly if you approach them from the outside. Particularly if you're armed with the acquired wisdom of Best Practice.

One example is the old-fashioned idea of what a 'Change Advisory Board' (CAB) should be. That is a regular (daily, weekly, monthly) meeting, with lots of people, who look at a long list of changes, and discuss them, one by one, until they get through the list, or everybody in the room has lost the will to live.

It is a bad idea for many reasons - very good reasons. So we produce a list of benefits of a proper change management system, with standard changes taking the place of the trivial, repetitive, and similar ones that kept turning up at the old CAB, and do all the other good things.

Then, six months, or a year, later, we go back and find that the old CAB is back in all its horrible tediousness.

How can this happen?

Things are as they are for a reason - even if it is a bad one

I think, from the ABC, and human perspective, we need to understand one awkward truth.

Some people actually enjoy the long, repetitive, groundhog-day type meetings, sometimes, mistakenly, called 'CABs'.

Life is challenging, change is risky, we know 'IT Heroes' are a poor role model, but, perhaps, we ought to realise that there is something rational about the old-style 'CAB'. It is the tortoise, hermit crab, or ostrich solution.

If change, when ignored, disappeared, it would even work.

When things are dangerously out of control, a regular, very formal, authoritarian meeting can be like a night light in the nursery. 

It doesn't keep the monsters at bay, but it enables you to feel relaxed enough about them to sleep.

What can we do?

If we want to make a change to an organisation, it isn't enough to be rational. Just saying why it is a good idea, and listing a lot of benefits, often sounds, to the organisation as.. 'just saying'.

You need to find out why things are as they are. Who does the current 'CAB' satisfy? Who is the person who sleeps happier in the false belief that it is protection? How did it come about? You might find that the person who first organised it is now quite senior, and is pleased with the solution he put together many years ago - if you don't convince him, he's not going to be happy if you kill his 'baby'.

Good, sound, excellent, even, as your ideas are, you have to accept they have one very big flaw. They were 'Not Invented Here' (NIH). You may see that as an advantage, and, rationally, it might be, but, if you actually want things to change, rather than just the pleasure of being right (which is just the other side of NIH, if you think about it), then you need to overcome this barrier, so that the right people want to RIH --- Reinvent It Here. Then it might work

The moral of the story

First find out why things are as they are. Then you'll understand what will keep them that way. That way you'll know who to persuade and what you need to use to persuade.

If you don't do this first, then you'll keep being surprised that organisations reject the obviously sane, rational, more effective and, even, more efficient solution, in favour of how they do it.

Back on-line

  • Published in News

We're back on-line

Sorry for the outage. There was a problem because the .org.za domain owner has changed, and I omitted to move our URL. I've moved it now, so you can see us again.

Remember, as a member of the itSMF South Africa, you are welcome to contribute a blog entry - just log on to the site and create a blog. 

 

Back on-line

  • Published in News

We're back on-line

Sorry for the outage. There was a problem because the .org.za domain owner has changed, and I omitted to move our URL. I've moved it now, so you can see us again.

Remember, as a member of the itSMF South Africa, you are welcome to contribute a blog entry - just log on to the site and create a blog. 

 

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